Repair Estimate Glossary of Terms

repair estimate glossary of terms
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A repair estimate is a rough estimate of the cost of repairing a vehicle rather than an exact figure. Mechanics don’t want to provide a smash repair quote or a fixed fee that could increase if they discover hidden damages. It could be tricky figuring out how to read a repair car estimate, which is it’s important that you know the most commonly used terms.

Repair estimates assist customers in budgeting for the total cost of repairs. Repair estimates are also helpful when the repairs are being paid for by a third party or an insurance company.  Try Flow Autobody’s instant repair estimator!

The overall cost of the car accident repair quotes is broken down into various areas in the repair estimate, including body labor, paint and refinish labor, mechanical labor and parts, and supplies and materials.

Whether the repair will be paid for out of pocket or by an insurance company determines the total cost of the repair estimate done by a panel beater estimator. This factor influences the labor rate, which differs from one auto shop to the next. If an insurance company pays for the repair, the insurance company determines the charges.

So, how to read a repair car estimate?

A repair estimate may contain a variety of abbreviations for repair words, parts, and supplies. We understand how frustrating it can be when industry professionals throw a load of acronyms or terminology in your face and expect you to “get it” right away.

But, it’s easier than ever before to interpret jargon, and we want to make it even simpler and quicker for you to know how to read a repair car estimate.

Thus, we’ve compiled a glossary of typical repair terms, acronyms, and abbreviations used in body shop estimates in this article.

read car repair estimate

Common Repair Car Estimate Terms

A-Pillar

The A-shaped front element of your car’s windscreen, as well as the sides. It is constructed of a robust steel material that can withstand collisions.

Aftermarket or A/M Parts

Non-OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) parts are aftermarket or A/M parts because lower known or generic companies frequently reverse-engineer them; they are usually of poor quality.

Alignment

Alignment is a computerized technique that restores the appropriate position and arrangement of a car’s wheels and suspension. It also entails adjusting the axles of your automobile, re-centering the steering wheel, and identifying worn-out components (such as suspension and tires) that need to be replaced.

Audanet Generated Times

Audanet Generated Times is an online quoting system that uses OEM Times and follows OEM-approved procedures.

B Pillar

The steel pillar in the middle of your car’s frame. It provides structural support because it is welded to the top and bottom panels. This pillar is absent in several car models, particularly sports cars.

B/Bar

It is a bumper bar put in the front and back of the vehicle.

Blend or Blending

The process of matching a car’s fresh base coat (colour) to the old surrounding paint is known as blending.

C-Pillar

Excluding SUVs and wagons, the C Pillar is the rearmost pillar placed behind the rear door in most cars.

Client Contribution

This is the additional payment to have further work completed and the existing insurance fixes.

D & A

The disassembly and assembly of components and parts for categorized line items on the estimate are D & A.

D-Pillar

The D-Pillar is the car’s rearmost pillar, supporting the rear glass and windscreen on SUVs and wagons.

Denibbing

Denibbing is the process of smoothing off dirt ‘nibs,’ or small bumps, particles, and flaws trapped on the completed surface of the panel.

Dis/Con

Disconnecting and reconnecting electrical components is referred to as Dis/Con.

Environmental Levy

The shop’s waste treatment and disposal fee is called the environmental levy.

Excess Amount

It is the amount you pay your insurance company if you want to file a claim (for example, minor damage) under your policy; it’s the amount you’re willing to contribute to the total repair expenses.

FTFN

The acronym FTFN stands for “Funny Time Funny Money.” It’s a quoting approach that involves inflating or offsetting lower hourly rates, which is typically impractical.

Genuine

These are “branded” parts that come in their original packaging from your car’s manufacturer.

L/H/F

This acronym stands for ‘left-hand front’.

L/H/R

This acronym stands for ‘left-hand right’.

LTAR

It stands for “Luxury Times and Rates,” and it’s a quotation process similar to NTAR. Still, it’s only for luxury vehicles that aren’t on the NTAR vehicle list.

Mechanical Pre-scan/Post-scan and Reset

A diagnostic scan is performed before and after repairs to check that all electronic equipment and systems are operational and that no error codes or malfunctions exist.

NTAR

This stands for New Times and Rates and is a quotation approach that uses a unique online software or system built by insurance companies to arrive at data-driven rates.

OEM

It stands for “Original Equipment Manufacturer,” which refers to parts made by or for the manufacturer by an OEM-approved business. These parts are often less expensive than the original parts. Still, they do not bear the manufacturer’s logo or arrive in branded packaging.

R + R

Remove and refit (R+R) is a general labor term that refers to removing and refitting parts.

R/H/F

This acronym stands for ‘right-hand front’.

R/H/R

This acronym stands for ‘right-hand rear’.

Re-feed

Re-feeding entails rewiring the electronic components of removed panels after they have been reinstalled.

RTRM

This is an abbreviation for ‘real-time real money”. It is a more transparent quoting process because actual labor rates, prices, and times are shown.

SMART Repairs

It is a short abbreviation for “Small and Medium Region Repair Technique,” this is a strategic restore procedure that uses specialized tools, products, and techniques to repair a specific damaged area as little as possible without compromising other nearby areas or panels.

Sublet

It is sometimes known as subcontractor labor, and this term refers to work that the body shop must outsource. Mechanical, windscreen, wheel alignment, A/C regassing, and decal application are typical sublet work.

Trim Identifier

This is a four-digit code that identifies your vehicle’s interior specific features and styling. It’s usually found beneath the VIN.

VIN

VIN stands for “Vehicle Identification Number,” which is the unique identifier for your vehicle.

Flow Autobody's Repair Experience

A body shop’s repair estimate may appear to be a jumble of acronyms and figures that don’t make sense to the average person. While receiving a copy is essential, it isn’t beneficial if you cannot understand it.

Knowing this information will assist you in better understanding the extent of your vehicle’s damage and the cost of repair. Here at Flow Autobody, we walk you through the repair plan and explain to you the itemized estimate so you know exactly what to expect. Using our customer portal, you'll be able to track the progress of you car as we work on it. Easily get a FREE ESTIMATE today or watch our video explainer on how to use our online repair estimator:

 

FAQs:

How accurate are car repair estimates?

Although usually entirely accurate, there may be some variation in the ultimate cost of receiving the car. The collision repair professional will not disassemble the vehicle when completing car accident repair quotes instead of estimating visible damages.
The estimator should only take about 30 minutes during an inspection to evaluate the damage to your car thoroughly. And since Flow Autobody wants to give you a repair estimate that you can be happy with, it will take us 24-48 hours to get back to you. During this time, we assess and make a plan of repair that justifies the estimate that we will send back.
How to get a car repair estimate?

A consumer can obtain a repair estimate in one of two ways. The consumer can either provide images of the damage to the auto shop and get panel beater quotes online or complete an in-person evaluation at the shop.

Insurance adjusters can also assist customers with repair estimates, especially if the insurance company will cover the costs. The insurance company, for instance, can send a field inspector to the facility for a visual assessment of the car to update the repair estimate. For utmost convenience, you can opt for crash repair quotes online.

For a seamless smash repair experience, request for a FREE instant repair estimate from Flow Autobody.

Tips & Tutorials

Repair Estimate Glossary of Terms

A repair estimate is a rough estimate of the cost of repairing a vehicle rather than an exact figure. Mechanics don’t want to provide a smash repair quote or a fixed fee that could increase if they discover hidden damages. It could be tricky figuring out how to read a repair car estimate, which is it’s important that you know the most commonly used terms.

Repair estimates assist customers in budgeting for the total cost of repairs. Repair estimates are also helpful when the repairs are being paid for by a third party or an insurance company.  Try Flow Autobody’s instant repair estimator!

The overall cost of the car accident repair quotes is broken down into various areas in the repair estimate, including body labor, paint and refinish labor, mechanical labor and parts, and supplies and materials.

Whether the repair will be paid for out of pocket or by an insurance company determines the total cost of the repair estimate done by a panel beater estimator. This factor influences the labor rate, which differs from one auto shop to the next. If an insurance company pays for the repair, the insurance company determines the charges.

So, how to read a repair car estimate?

A repair estimate may contain a variety of abbreviations for repair words, parts, and supplies. We understand how frustrating it can be when industry professionals throw a load of acronyms or terminology in your face and expect you to “get it” right away.

But, it’s easier than ever before to interpret jargon, and we want to make it even simpler and quicker for you to know how to read a repair car estimate.

Thus, we’ve compiled a glossary of typical repair terms, acronyms, and abbreviations used in body shop estimates in this article.


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Common Repair Car Estimate Terms

A-Pillar

The A-shaped front element of your car’s windscreen, as well as the sides. It is constructed of a robust steel material that can withstand collisions.

Aftermarket or A/M Parts

Non-OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) parts are aftermarket or A/M parts because lower known or generic companies frequently reverse-engineer them; they are usually of poor quality.

Alignment

Alignment is a computerized technique that restores the appropriate position and arrangement of a car’s wheels and suspension. It also entails adjusting the axles of your automobile, re-centering the steering wheel, and identifying worn-out components (such as suspension and tires) that need to be replaced.

Audanet Generated Times

Audanet Generated Times is an online quoting system that uses OEM Times and follows OEM-approved procedures.

B Pillar

The steel pillar in the middle of your car’s frame. It provides structural support because it is welded to the top and bottom panels. This pillar is absent in several car models, particularly sports cars.

B/Bar

It is a bumper bar put in the front and back of the vehicle.

Blend or Blending

The process of matching a car’s fresh base coat (colour) to the old surrounding paint is known as blending.

C-Pillar

Excluding SUVs and wagons, the C Pillar is the rearmost pillar placed behind the rear door in most cars.

Client Contribution

This is the additional payment to have further work completed and the existing insurance fixes.

D & A

The disassembly and assembly of components and parts for categorized line items on the estimate are D & A.

D-Pillar

The D-Pillar is the car’s rearmost pillar, supporting the rear glass and windscreen on SUVs and wagons.

Denibbing

Denibbing is the process of smoothing off dirt ‘nibs,’ or small bumps, particles, and flaws trapped on the completed surface of the panel.

Dis/Con

Disconnecting and reconnecting electrical components is referred to as Dis/Con.

Environmental Levy

The shop’s waste treatment and disposal fee is called the environmental levy.

Excess Amount

It is the amount you pay your insurance company if you want to file a claim (for example, minor damage) under your policy; it’s the amount you’re willing to contribute to the total repair expenses.

FTFN

The acronym FTFN stands for “Funny Time Funny Money.” It’s a quoting approach that involves inflating or offsetting lower hourly rates, which is typically impractical.

Genuine

These are “branded” parts that come in their original packaging from your car’s manufacturer.

L/H/F

This acronym stands for ‘left-hand front’.

L/H/R

This acronym stands for ‘left-hand right’.

LTAR

It stands for “Luxury Times and Rates,” and it’s a quotation process similar to NTAR. Still, it’s only for luxury vehicles that aren’t on the NTAR vehicle list.

Mechanical Pre-scan/Post-scan and Reset

A diagnostic scan is performed before and after repairs to check that all electronic equipment and systems are operational and that no error codes or malfunctions exist.

NTAR

This stands for New Times and Rates and is a quotation approach that uses a unique online software or system built by insurance companies to arrive at data-driven rates.

OEM

It stands for “Original Equipment Manufacturer,” which refers to parts made by or for the manufacturer by an OEM-approved business. These parts are often less expensive than the original parts. Still, they do not bear the manufacturer’s logo or arrive in branded packaging.

R + R

Remove and refit (R+R) is a general labor term that refers to removing and refitting parts.

R/H/F

This acronym stands for ‘right-hand front’.

R/H/R

This acronym stands for ‘right-hand rear’.

Re-feed

Re-feeding entails rewiring the electronic components of removed panels after they have been reinstalled.

RTRM

This is an abbreviation for ‘real-time real money”. It is a more transparent quoting process because actual labor rates, prices, and times are shown.

SMART Repairs

It is a short abbreviation for “Small and Medium Region Repair Technique,” this is a strategic restore procedure that uses specialized tools, products, and techniques to repair a specific damaged area as little as possible without compromising other nearby areas or panels.

Sublet

It is sometimes known as subcontractor labor, and this term refers to work that the body shop must outsource. Mechanical, windscreen, wheel alignment, A/C regassing, and decal application are typical sublet work.

Trim Identifier

This is a four-digit code that identifies your vehicle’s interior specific features and styling. It’s usually found beneath the VIN.

VIN

VIN stands for “Vehicle Identification Number,” which is the unique identifier for your vehicle.

Takeaway

A body shop’s repair estimate may appear to be a jumble of acronyms and figures that don’t make sense to the average person. While receiving a copy is essential, it isn’t beneficial if you cannot understand it.

Knowing this information will assist you in better understanding the extent of your vehicle’s damage and the cost of repair. We hope that this guide has helped you understand your vehicle estimate better. Whenever you need it, our guide will come in handy!

Frequently Asked Questions About Repair Estimates

How accurate are car repair estimates?
Although usually entirely accurate, there may be some variation in the ultimate cost of receiving the car. The collision repair professional will not disassemble the vehicle when completing car accident repair quotes instead of estimating visible damages.
How long does a car repair estimate take?
The estimator should only take about 30 minutes to evaluate the damage to your car thoroughly. While you wait and distinguish the estimated time to repair, many auto body repair shops provide a nice waiting room, and some even enable you to drop your car off so you can get on with your day.
How to get a car repair estimate?

A consumer can obtain a repair estimate in a variety of methods. The consumer can either provide images of the damage to the auto shop and get panel beater quotes online or complete an in-person evaluation at the shop.

Insurance adjusters can also assist customers with repair estimates, especially if the insurance company will cover the costs. The insurance company, for instance, can send a field inspector to the facility for a visual assessment of the car to update the repair estimate. For utmost convenience, you can opt for crash repair quotes online.

For a seamless smash repair experience, request for a FREE instant repair estimate from Flow Autobody.

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